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The Boston bombings seen through the eyes of an arab muslim student

By   /   May 3, 2013  /   Comments Off

Dina Abdalla is 19, graduated from Waubonsee Valley High School in 2012 and is currently an Internation Relations major at the college. Dina is an American Egyptian Muslim. In her free time, she likes to read, travel, and volunteer with CAR (Council on American Ilsmaic Relations).

Dina Abdalla is 19, graduated from Waubonsee Valley High School in 2012 and is currently an Internation Relations major at the college. Dina is an American Egyptian Muslim. In her free time, she likes to read, travel, and volunteer with CAR (Council on American Ilsmaic Relations).

By Dina Abdalla

News Contributor

 

During the Boston marathon, two presser cooker bombs exploded 13 seconds apart by the finish line on April 15.

A total of 3 civilians were killed and over 264 were injured.

As all of America mourned the FBI was hard at work looking for the perpetrators of the attack.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev were pronounced the alleged terrorists on April 18. That’s where I come in.

 

April 18 was such a crazy day. I had started the day at 5 a.m. with my work shift, making coffee for corporate America.

Soon, I was hearing murmurs from my customers. “I heard they were Muslim,” “No they were Chechen,” “What is that?” “Isn’t that Russia?”

Chechen… Muslims… At that moment I was sure that my heart had sunk down to my stomach.

That whole week I was praying that the Boston marathon bombers weren’t Muslim.

Although, people were telling me, “Dina, you can’t talk like that,” I was still talking like that; but only because I was scared.

We would have to go back to the hysteria, the 9/11 references, the turban, camel, al Qaeda slurs, the discrimination.

So when CNN was the first to report about the involvement of Islamic radicalization involving the bombers, I was the first to groan.

Sitting there, in my living room watching the broadcast, I started to cry uncontrollably.

I was so scared that day that I had my tears streaming down my face. I was scared to drive to my mosque for Friday prayers, wondering what could happen to the Muslim community next.

I was scared for my mom, who wears a headscarf when so many Muslims have been hurt after the public had been informed that the Tsarnaev brothers were the planters of this bloody mess.

People do not understand that these so-called Muslim related terrorist attacks affect us in the most negative ways.

A moment in New York City after the bombings went viral, an innocent Muslim woman wearing the hijab (headscarf), while sitting on the subway, had hot coffee thrown in her face by an angry civilian.

And even the day before, another Muslim woman wearing the hijab was physically harassed in Boston by yet another angry and stereotyping civilian.

I am so tired of individuals who hijack my religion to justify their horrendous beliefs.

Nowhere in Islam does it say that killing innocent women and children totals to jihad.

What’s even more frustrating is the fact that non-Muslims are always expecting me to apologize and constantly condemn these attacks.

It’s getting pretty old.

These attacks committed by terrorists do not even represent 2% of Muslims worldwide. So I’ll leave it at that.

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  • Published: 12 months ago on May 3, 2013
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  • Last Modified: May 3, 2013 @ 4:45 pm
  • Filed Under: News

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